Your million-dollar retirement in 10 steps

If you could take 10 steps and end up with a million dollars to retire on, what’s the first thing you’d buy?

A big house? A boat? A new car?

You could easily afford all three of these things and much more when you take these 10 simple steps.

Picture checking your bank account and seeing this number: $1,099,517.00

Of course, that’s only the start of it… if you wanted to, you could take 20 steps and reach $120,893,158.00!

That’s the beauty of this formula… You’ll only need 10 steps to a million-dollar retirement, but the number of steps you take after that million is up to you.

Your 10 steps to a million-dollar retirement all has to do with the power of compounding AND cutting off your retirement fund manager completely.

Let’s start with the concept of compounding:

Let’s say you made a $1,000 investment, and you made a 60% gain on it ($600)—what would be the best thing for you to do with that extra $600?

Most people would use it for bills and shopping, but once you understand the power of compounding, you’ll see that the best thing to do with that money is reinvest it.

If you made 60% on your money per year, which is entirely possible with what I’m about to show you, you’d have turned $10,000 into a million in 10 years.

Let’s stack this investment strategy up next to your traditional fund manager’s… I’m going to give him the benefit of the doubt that he can match the market’s 9% average—even though we both know most fund managers are incapable of achieving that.

  Traditional Retirement Fund 10 Steps Fund
Initial Investment $10,000 $10,000
Year 1 $10,900 $16,000
Year 2 $11,881 $25,600
Year 3 $12,950 $40,960
Year 4 $14,116 $65,536
Year 5 $15,386 $104,858
Year 6 $16,771 $167,773
Year 7 $18,280 $268,437
Year 8 $19,925 $429,499
Year 9 $21,718 $687,198
Year 10 $23,673 $1,099,517

I believe this is a no brainer. The 10 Steps fund outperformed your traditional fund manager by 4,544% over 10 years!

How does retiring with $1,099,517 sound compared to retiring with $23,673?

So, you’re probably asking: if this is so easy, why isn’t everybody dumping their fund managers and hopping on board?

Well, that’s because fund managers are good salespeople.

They know every trick in the book that’ll almost always convince you to keep your money with them… it’s what they’re trained to do.

But I’m going to introduce you to a strategy that’ll cut your fund manager off and get you to your million-dollar retirement.

In order to reach this luxurious retirement, you’re going to have to bear with me as I convince you that the stock market is the best way to go…

Stop right there!

I know you’re doubting me at the moment.

“The stock market is scary/risky/too complicated!”

First of all, your retirement fund manager is investing your money in the stock market, so if you wanna talk about retirement at all, we have to talk about the stock market…

Second of all, listen to how easy it is:

What you want to do first is find an industry that has an exciting near-term future…

For this example, I’m going to consider the autonomous car industry. Now, of course we can look at automobile stocks.

Tesla (TSLA) would be a perfect stock to invest in with this mindset, but I want to dig a little deeper.

Everybody and their mother will be jumping into Tesla for years to come. So, for this 60% annual gain we need to get you to a million, let’s think outside the box.

What do Tesla vehicles rely on to move forward in this rapidly inflating market?

Batteries.

Makes sense, right?

Let’s look at the company that’s supplying Tesla with their batteries…

NVidia (NVDA).

NVDA stock has risen over 610% in the past 10 years… in other words, it’s increased over 61% per year on average.

It’s perfect for us.

So, what action do you need to take?

You could invest $10,000 in NVDA (when the timing’s right!) and use the power of compounding—which is the most important part—and watch your money stack up until you’ve reached that big million-dollar retirement.

Bookmark and Share facebook twitter twitter

Leave a Comment

*

*